Mark and Erika are the sort of people that instantly make you feel comfortable when you’re around them. They’re thoughtful, funny, down to earth and full of laughter. At the end of a month-long stretch of shooting over a wedding a week (not to mention moving and pulling off a thesis show), their low-key celebration out at a remote cabin in Index Washington was a welcome change of pace. While editing, I enjoyed experimenting with cross-processed color and low contrast black and white. Let me know what you think!

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Colin and Rachel contacted me last minute to see if I could photograph their rehearsal dinner. Because Colin’s dad had been in a serious accident shortly beforehand, it was especially important to capture memories from the evening. I was glad to be available and hope these pictures do justice to a beautiful evening. Visit the main gallery here if you’d like to see more (just so you can see for yourself that Urban Light Studios actually has a wall covered in antique paint by numbers, and, among other things, a stuffed tiger).

Event Photography at Urban Light Studios in Wallingford Seattle

Yes that’s mineral water going into the champagne glass. Awesome.

empty wine glasses on elegant counter top. Urban Light Studios event

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When Kate and Brian first contacted me about photographing their wedding on Lummi Island, I immediately got excited about capturing their day in a place close to my heart. (I grew up looking out at the San Juans from my bedroom window and doing kayak/sailing trips through the islands each summer). They held an intimate ceremony and reception at the Willows Inn, which is one of the most beautiful and unpretentious venues I’ve had the opportunity to work at. Throughout the day I loved witnessing Brian and Kate’s quirky unassuming love for each other and their community. Here’s to a beautiful life together!

For more photos visit the full gallery here.

bride and groom say vows outdoors at willows inn on lummi island

groom reading vows to bride outside on lummi island at the willows inn wedding garden

bride smiling at groom while he reads vows

amazingly enthusiastic smile from bride to groom

bride and groom kiss under arbor outside on lummi island. black and white.

bride and groom walk through tunnel of green down to beach

groom carrying bride at beach on lummi island near bellingham
newlywed groom carries bride on beach

rocks and wine at wedding reception, detail shot.

flower decorations, farmers market style

outdoor wedding reception at willows inn on lummi island

flowers in vase inside at willows inn

lummi island salmon being roasted at the willows inn on lummi island

amazing buffet of healthy food being served at willows in on lummi island for wedding reception

father of bride leads toasts at wedding reception

bride and groom smiling during toasts

bride and groom cut green cake

bride and groom taking the first slice of their cake

groom having fun dancing with bride at willows in, around sunset.

groom having fun dancing with bride at willows in, black and white

silhouette of couple kissing by the ocean on lummi island

beautiful full moon setting over ocean by lummi island ferry dock

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It was such a joy to capture Ben Heller and Kayti Krepel’s marriage! I already knew them a bit from our church in Seattle, but I felt like I got to really see them at their wedding. The service was a beautiful celebration of their relationship and their faith. I also loved all the hippy details that made their day special: outside at Parsons Gardens, barefoot, acoustic, and full of color. And did I mention that the entire wedding party decided to climb up into a tree for photos? Awesome.

henna tattoos on brides hands (detail)

curling bride's hair for wedding (detail)

bride and maid of honor laughing while they get ready for wedding

wedding in parsons garden seattle

groom looking at bride during wedding ceremony in garden. black and white

wedding party from behind

groom washing bride's feet. sepia tone black and white

bride groom and minister laughing

bride and groom kiss

bridesmaid signing as witness on marriage license

bride and groom embrace in garden

bride and groom walk through wooded path in garden

bride looking up at groom

barefoot bridesmaids with colorful dresses (close up)

bridesmaids jumping in the air

groomsmen helping bridesmaids climb into tree

entire wedding party in a tree! awesome.

wedding party in tree, closer up

bride and groom kiss in tree

bride and groom kiss in tree, sepia tone black and white

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James McGeathey and Tiffany Turner had a small, beautiful ceremony with family and friends at Elizabeth Park in Bellingham. Throughout the day, I enjoyed James’ fun, playful attitude and Tiffany’s creative attention to all the details. There was definitely a classy, creative vibe to the celebration, and I was especially impressed by the wedding cupcakes. You are both supported by your friends and family, and I wish you the best in your new marriage!

bride getting ready. sepia tone black and white

bride smiling and looking up. getting ready for wedding. sepia toned black and white

bride and groom getting married in gazebo

detail of groomsmen's shiny black shoes at wedding. sepia toned black and white

bride looking at groom

groom looking at bride

bride and groom wearing new wedding bands

bride and groom kiss while audience takes pictures

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Liz and I started off a crazy month of wedding photography by capturing Zach Wright and Dannielle Coleman’s wedding at Bybee Farms in North Bend, Washington. We were refreshed not only be the gorgeous outdoor location, but by the overwhelming support we felt for Zach and Dannielle by their friends and family. Their grounding in their faith and their heartfelt commitment to each other were a blessing to witness.

View the full gallery and order professional prints here.

bridesmaids getting ready for wedding

flowers and arbor at outdoor wedding venue

groomsmen trying out zach's "wedding present"

bride putting on garter while getting ready for wedding

bride putting on wedding dress

bride putting on makeup

bride outside waiting to see groom

bride outside waiting to see groom

groom's first look at bride

bride and groom kiss

bride and groom dip

wedding flowers, close up

B&W of groom's shoes

bride and groom getting married outside under arbor

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The U.S.S. Grover is a glass bottom boat that I built for my camera. This project simply designed to be a way of capturing images underwater, particularly in shallow areas where one may not make a point of using a truly waterproof camera. Through the complexity of both fabrication and use, however, I encountered several unexpected outcomes.

In many ways, I found that the images we do see from underwater are less interesting than the fact that we can’t naturally see through water (even if we submerge ourselves, our eyes won’t focus the light). By cobbling together a contraption that interrupts this boundary, we cross into a world that is alien and uninhabitable. There is a degree of physicality to this process: wading through cold water, leaning down to block glare, and peering through your own shadow. Even the device itself breaks the surface of the water and changes its flow. Something about this feels mythical–like physically reaching into an otherworldly portal. And interestingly, this portal can send us in many directions. Without a shadow to block glare, the darkness underwater turns the glass window into a reflective mirror, revealing the world above me–at whatever distance I choose to focus. It is also possible to focus neither underwater or above, but only on the pane of glass itself.

Musing about the implications of this project, I’ve wondered how much photography has been altered by the limitations our cameras face in accessing the world? I wonder also, how building appendages that extend the reach of our cameras might redefine our relationship to image making?

What do you think?

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View HD version of Journey Through a Log here.

As I’ve dabbled in sculpture, I’ve become particularly fascinated by interior spaces of wood. Any time a cut is made through wood, we get a snapshot of the inside, but we rarely get to see any continuity between these spaces.

This video is a journey through the interior of about 3′ of a log. For each of the 113 frames, a physical cross-section of wood was cut off (in a long, sawdusty, painful process). “Journey Through a Log” is the resulting stop motion.

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During my time in Havasupai, I frequently returned to photographing the formations of rocks. Some formations looked almost like alien worm colonies. Others looked more like lava tubes, and a few made me think of giant bird bones that had been sectioned out. After two or three days of watching how the water interacted with objects it touched, it became apparent that these formations were the result of contact with plants that had since died and rotted out. Even tender new roots from grass seemed to calcify as soon as they could grow. In a very immediate way, the shapes and textures of the canyon are determined by the lives of the plants growing in it. Knowing this, it is clear why the formations of travertine reminded me living forms.

From a more general perspective, I profoundly appreciate how my completely superficial aesthetic interest opened the door to a deeper empirical understanding–moreover, how this understanding then multiplied the depth of my wonder at the visual content.

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Right now I’m in the middle of preparing my Thesis Show and shooting a ton of weddings. I’m excited about everything I’m doing, but it’s way more than I’ve juggled before! There’s always time for distractions, though–these MRI cross-sections of fruit (from the “Inside Insides” blog) are way too awesome not to share.


Vertical Pineapple cross sections

Go to the Inside Insides blog to view more imagery. If you like this, you should check out Nick Veasey’s X-Ray Photos.

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Curious Imagery just launched a social presence on Facebook. While a walk by the ocean is my preferred “social media,” I’m hoping that this will make it easier to communicate with clients, get feedback on what’s working best, and share my photography.

You can help give this a little momentum just by clicking the “Like” button below. Thanks!

For you Facebook Gurus out there, I’d love tips. How have you seen a business page used best?

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© 2011 Curious Imaginings Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha