Last week I shot an MFA show for one of my sculpture teachers, Lisa Rickey. Her piece, “Reflection,” is currently on display at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle. She made the group of giant metal pillows by inflating flat stainless sheet steel (sealed on the edges) with pressurized gas. In Lisa’s work, I particularly appreciate her interest in unique material behaviors. In “Reflection” she uses the specular properties of stainless steel to create a sort of visual conversation amongst the pillows and their environment. I find it fitting that her orignal title was going to be “Pillow Talk.”


Continue reading »

Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • StumbleUpon
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • MySpace
  • Technorati
  • Google Bookmarks
  • TwitThis
  • connotea
  • Bloglines
  • Reddit
  • YahooBuzz
  • Slashdot
 

After posting on oxy-acetylene earlier, I thought it might be appropriate to share an example of what someone might normally do with these tools. “Untitled Tree” is my first serious attempt at using steel as a material (made Spring of 2009). It was in the process of creating this piece that I became intrigued by many of the residual artifacts left over from welding, plasma cutting, hammering, grinding, and ocy-acet torching. In many ways, the aesthetic of this tree has been purposefully built around these artifacts.

This tree is one in a series of several I have made exploring the animate qualities of trees as creatures as well as the mythical quality of trees as a habitation. The other trees are made from coiled clay, driftwood, and a lost-wax glass casting. The photos below are from the 3D4M Undergraduate Juried Exhibition, where my steel tree was selected for display (Winter 2010). If you’re interested in seeing the rest of the show, I also photographed my peers’ work and posted the images to a gallery.

The cavity toward the top of the tree was designed to hold a candle. When lit, the branches cast incredible shadows!

The holes outside this cavity can be seen as windows in a dwelling space.

The leaves were made by a mixture of hammering, oxy-acet heating/bending, and angle grinding.
The edge on the base is a deep, angled plasma cut.


My favorite leaf.

Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • StumbleUpon
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • MySpace
  • Technorati
  • Google Bookmarks
  • TwitThis
  • connotea
  • Bloglines
  • Reddit
  • YahooBuzz
  • Slashdot
 

As I’ve begun learning to make things with metal, I’ve been captivated by many of the unintentional visual artifacts left behind. Techniques like welding, plasma cutting, hammering, and oxy-acetylene torching are generally used to modify a 3D form, but I wanted to make a piece that specifically highlights the artifacts they leave behind.

This video below is a stop motion of 447 frames captured over about 15 minutes of torching a 24″x24″ piece of sheet steel. Even though I’ve put a lot of hours in using this technique, this is actually the first time I’ve been able to watch the process without darkening effect of protective eye wear and the pressure of operating the torch.

NOTE: For proper viewing, click the link to my Vimeo page and view full screen in 720p HD

Oxy-Acetylene Torch on Brushed Steel from Daniel Nelson on Vimeo.

I brushed the steel beforehand to remove the oily milling on the outside, so the temperature changes would be more visible.

The rainbow outlines the edges of the areas that have been heated, while the dot is literally glowing hot.

The fading intensity of the glow traces where the torch as been. Note the dark blistered circles in the areas that received the most heat.

Continue reading »

Share and Enjoy: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • StumbleUpon
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • MySpace
  • Technorati
  • Google Bookmarks
  • TwitThis
  • connotea
  • Bloglines
  • Reddit
  • YahooBuzz
  • Slashdot
© 2011 Curious Imaginings Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha