Right now I’m in the middle of preparing my Thesis Show and shooting a ton of weddings. I’m excited about everything I’m doing, but it’s way more than I’ve juggled before! There’s always time for distractions, though–these MRI cross-sections of fruit (from the “Inside Insides” blog) are way too awesome not to share.


VerticalĀ Pineapple cross sections

Go to the Inside Insides blog to view more imagery. If you like this, you should check out Nick Veasey’s X-Ray Photos.

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Hi Friends, While I’m working on pulling together a few posts from my recent thesis work, I thought I’d share a few awesome things I’ve run into recently. Enjoy!

SFINA: Time Stoppers
The first part of this video is the same “bullet time” technique that was pioneered in 1999 for The Matrix. It gets especially interesting toward the end when the participants mix this technique with long-exposure light painting.

Sfina:13. Timestopers from SFINA on Vimeo.

TinEye
Upload an image, then see where it lives on the web. This tool has totally revolutionized my ability to legitimately investigate orphaned imagery that captures my interest. If you’re interested, also check out “Google Goggles.”
http://www.tineye.com


Beetle Cam

Ever wondered what a lion looks like from the perspective of a small rodent who’s about to be consumed?
http://www.petapixel.com/2010/04/20/beetlecam-shoots-african-wildlife-up-close/


New Stop Motion of Solar Flares

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8635207.stm

Galileo
A beautiful animated 2D short. Gorgeous, slightly disturbing.

Galileo from Ghislain Avrillon on Vimeo.

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Over Christmas break I stumbled across something that restored a sense of creative hope I haven’t felt in a long time.

My hometown Bellingham occupies a special place in the hearts of myself and many others. Of course it is far from perfect, but it still functions as sort of sanctuary for hold-out hippies, outdoor adventurers, writers, recluses, musicians, local business, co-ops, gardeners, artists, and the like. I couldn’t have asked for a better place to grow up.

Recently, however, it seems that any change tends to be bad news. Out of control residential development has replaced the howls of coyotes below my parents home, truly awesome playgrounds have been torn down by new safety codes, the BNSF railway continues to own most of our state coastline, access points to rivers and trails regularly get sealed off, businesses gentrify or are replaced by national chains, and suburban retirement destinations stamp over local wild places. These changes seem to threaten the very identity that makes a place like Bellingham extraordinary. Is it melodramatic to describe this process as a sort of self-inflicted cultural genocide?

Please join me for a short photo story. As you read, you might consider some of the questions that this adventure provoked me to re-ask:

  • Is the tragedy of the commons without exception? Is it possible to share materially without being completely taken advantage of?
  • As a society, are we a curse on the land? Is it possible for our actions to have a neutral or positive visual and environmental impact?
  • On a more general level, is our built infrastructure destroying the substance that keeps our hearts alive?
  • Can we do anything worthwhile in the public domain without getting shut down?
  • In a context of deep sadness, can we still experience playfulness and wonder?

What do you think? I’d love to hear everyone’s $0.02 in the comments.

Continue reading »

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Sorry for the bad pun (and forgive the enthusiastic background music). This is incredible.

This process seems similar to non-newtonian substance called Oobleck (word coined by Dr. Suess in Bartholomew and the Oobleck). Wikipedia has more info. The image below is from an Oobleck experiment in an art class that Liz and I taught last summer.

Oobleck experiment from an art class Liz and I taught last summer.

Note: video originally posted with article here

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The post title is actually completely non-conceptual. I was just reading an article on a project mapping tube-shaped corridors in space where there is a strong gravitational pull in a specific direction …the effect of which is like a consistent trade wind or ocean current pulling you toward your destination.

gravity_corridor

Here’s the (slightly more) technical description:
http://www.physorg.com/news172302860.html

And a more readable one:
http://www.popsci.com/military-aviation-amp-space/article/2009-09/scientists-map-out-gravitational-space-highways

Also… if you haven’t seen any of the new Hubble images since the sensor was replaced, they are spectacular. Note that since NASA is a government org, these images are all in the public domain and are accessible in uber-high resolution to download for free (think 20×30″ digital photo prints). Link here.

new_hubble

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© 2011 Curious Imaginings Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha